Bulletin Feast Day Tips

Below are Feast Day Tips for your church bulletin. This content is free and can be copied and pasted right into your bulletin. We only ask that whenever you choose to use this content, you also include the last sentence to inform anyone interested in celebrating the feasts and seasons know that there is a shop that caters to them specifically.   

 

Bulletin – August 15

St. Michael’s Lent

St. Michael’s Lent is what St. Francis termed the period between the Assumption, August 15, and the feast of St. Michael, September 29. By its name, it sounds like a period of intense prayer to St. Michael. While turning to St. Michael during this period is significant, St. Francis used the time to fast, pray, and give alms focusing always on the cross. It was during St. Michael’s Lent when he received the stigmata. Can you commit to adding another period of fasting and prayer to your life this year? Are you ready to start Monday morning?

Visit feastday.co for more help celebrating the feasts and seasons.

 

 

Bulletin – August 22

St. Augustine

There are a number of saints associated with brewers but St. Augustine is one of the most popular. While there much more to St. Augustine than being a patron of brewers, taking time to celebrate his feast and let others know about this great father of the early Church while have a pint with friends next Saturday is a beautiful way to celebrate his feast. Though finding beer from the Belgium Augustinians might be difficult, supporting other brewing monks on this feast would only add to the feast.

Visit feastday.co for more help celebrating the feasts and seasons.

 

 

Bulletin – August 29

St. Gregory the Great

September 3 is the feast of St. Gregory the Great. Legend has it that on the feast of St. Mark, Pope St. Gregory the Great, became overwhelmed with a craving for cherries. A servant wandering through the garden was visited by St. Mark who blessed him with one cherry tree to produce early. The cherries were taken to St. Gregory and a tradition continues of popes enjoying a bowl of cherries on the feast of St. Mark. Spend September 3 enjoying those last cherries of summer with a cherry pie.

Visit feastday.co for more help celebrating the feasts and seasons.

 

Bulletin – September 5

Nativity of the Blessed Virgin Mary

The feast of the Nativity of the Blessed Virgin Mary on September 8th can be celebrated a few ways. First, fruit is traditional for any Marian feast. So, choose a seasonal fruit dessert to serve as dessert this Wednesday. Another option that is becoming increasingly popular, especially if you have children, is a birthday cake. Of course, nothing is keeping you from combining both of these options.

Visit feastday.co for more help celebrating the feasts and seasons.

 

 

Bulletin – September 12

Exaltation of the Holy Cross

The Exaltation of the Holy Cross is beautifully celebrated in the Holy Land. Like all celebrations, lots of good food is served. Enjoying hummus or baklava with your dinner on September 14th will bring some of those flavors home. But what is most impressive is the tradition of topping homes with a glowing cross. You might not be able to put a cross on top of your roof this week but what about hanging one on the outside of your door during the week we celebrate the feast of the Cross.

Visit feastday.co for more help celebrating the feasts and seasons.

 

 

Bulletin – September 19

San Gennaro

Like St. Joseph and Our Lady of Mount Carmel, St. Januarius, or San Gennaro, patron of Naples, is honored with festivals at many Italian parishes and is traditionally celebrated with pizza. He is noted for a unique miracle that reoccurs three times a year. On his feast, the first Saturday of May, and Dec. 16, the anniversary of the 1631 eruption of Mount Vesuvius, his dried blood liquifies. Celebrate his feast day today, September 19, with pizza.

Visit feastday.co for more help celebrating the feasts and seasons.

 

 

Bulletin – September 29

St. Michael the Archangel

In most parts of Europe, the feast of St. Michael is celebrated with goose. If you haven’t already planned a Michaelmas celebration, it might be difficult for you to get a goose by Wednesday. However, there are some traditional desserts. A story is told that after being thrown from Heaven Satan fell on a blackberry bush and spit on it in anger. Therefore, any blackberries picked after the feast of St. Michael will be too bitter. As a result, blackberries are a traditional part of  Michaelmas and a blackberry cobbler would be a great option.

Visit feastday.co for more help celebrating the feasts and seasons.